Ploughing Through Theoretical Physics Textbooks Is Therapeutic

And finally science confirms it, in a sense.

Again and again, I’ve harped on this pet theory of mine – on this blog and elsewhere on the web: At the peak of my immersion in the so-called corporate world, as a super-busy bonus miles-collecting consultant, I turned to the only solace: Getting up (even) earlier, and starting to re-read all my old mathematics and physics textbooks and lecture notes.

The effect was two-fold: It made me more detached, perhaps more Stoic when facing the seemingly urgent challenges of the accelerated world. Maybe it already prepared me for a long and gradual withdrawal from that biosphere. But surprisingly, I felt it also made my work results (even ;-)) better: I clearly remember compiling documentation I wrote after setting up some security infrastructure with a client. Writing precise documentation was again more like casting scientific research results into stone, carefully picking each term and trying to be as succinct as possible.

As anybody else I enjoy reading about psychological research that confirms my biases one-datapoint-based research – and here it finally is. Thanks to Professor Gary for sharing it. Science says that Corporate-Speak Makes You Stupid. Haven’t we – Dilbert fans – always felt that this has to be true?

… I’ve met otherwise intelligent people, after working with management consultant, are convinced that infinitely-malleable concepts like “disruptive innovation,” “business ecosystem,” and “collaborative culture” have objective value.

In my post In Praise of Textbooks with Tons of Formulas I focused on possible positive explanations, like speeding up your rational System 2 ((c) Daniel Kahneman) – by getting accustomed to mathematics again. By training yourself to recognize patterns and to think out of the box when trying to find the clever twist to solve a physics problem. Re-reading this, I cringe though: Thinking out of the box has entered the corporate vocabulary already. Disclaimer: I am talking about ways to pick a mathematical approach, by drawing on other, slightly related problems intuitively – in the way Kahneman explains the so-called intuition of experts as pattern recognition.

But perhaps the explanation is really as simple as that we just need to shield ourselves from negative effects of certain ecosystems and cultures that are particularly intrusive and mind-bending. So this is my advice to physics and math graduates: Do not rely on your infamous analytical skills forever. First, using that phrase in a job application sounds like phony hollow BS (as unfortunately any self-advertising of social skills does). Second, these skills are real, but they will decay exponentially if you don’t hone them.

6 volumes on all of Theoretical Physics - 1960s self-consistent series by my late professor Wilhelm Macke

Where to Find What?

I have confessed on this blog that I have Mr. Monk DVDs for a reason. We like to categorize, tag, painstakingly re-organize, and re-use. This is reflected in our Innovations in Agriculture …

The Seedbank: Left-over squared timber met the chopsaw.

The Nursery: Rebirth of copper tubes and newspapers.

… as well as in my periodical Raking The Virtual Zen Garden: Updating collections of web resources, especially those related to the heat pump system.

Here is a list of lists, sorted by increasing order of compactification:

But thanks to algorithms, we get helpful advice on presentation from social media platforms: Facebook, for example, encouraged me to tag products in the following photo, so here we go:

“Hand-crafted, artisanal, mobile nursery from recycled metal and wood, for holding biodegradable nursery pots.” Produced without crowd-funding and not submitted to contests concerned with The Intersection of Science, Art, and Innovation.

Social Debt (Tech Professional’s Anecdotes)

I have enjoyed Ben Horowitz’ book The Hard Thing About Hard Things. Farnamstreet’s review is perfect so I will not attempt at writing one. I will focus on one idea I found most intriguing.

I read Horowitz’ book as an account of dealing with hard decisions in general, about having to decide alone, about personal accountability, about having to pick the lesser of two evils.

The idea that stuck with me in particular is Management Debt, and Horowitz also blogged about this.

… management debt is incurred when you make an expedient, short-term management decision with an expensive, long-term consequence.

You accumulate Management Debt if you try to fix an organizational issue quickly by acting inconsistently. Horowitz’ example: You might give an employee a raise in order to stop her from leaving the company. But she had discussed her plans with another employee who then wonders why she stayed; so she feels pressed to explain the reason to him. Then others learn how to blackmail you in order to get a raise, etc..

From my short stint as a manager I am familiar with such situations but I rather like to extend the concept to Social or Political Debt. I believe that we, as human social animals, tend to focus on resolving the conflict right in front of you, rather than considering seemingly abstract consequences in the future.

I am thinking of the expert bombarded with all kinds of requests. As a professional it is hard to avoid them: People who to want to pick your brain and just like to have 5 minutes so you can glance over their problems. For free. Trying to help all of them – on top of working with paying clients – would be the equivalent of trying to copy a full book at the photocopier but yielding to anybody who wants to copy just a single page.

As a fallible human you might give in to the most intrusive requester just to get rid of him or her. You think that explaining your seemingly cold-hearted rationale would take more time and would be more emotionally taxing than just fulfilling the request.

But those people will return with more problems, and their acquaintances will, too. You have incurred debt, and there is interest rate. The moment of refusal might be difficult though, in particular with requests in the blurry area between business and private. How to say No to that alleged or self-declared old friend?

I am a believer in 1) Stating clearly what you don’t want and don’t do (rather than focusing on the positive) without feeling the need to explain yourself and 2) “Principles” – a short list of your values, or guiding principles you always follow. Both need need to be ingrained in your mind so that you react accordingly in case you receive those e-mails and calls out of the blue.

The paradoxical or sad thing is that explanations are most often futile. There are many good reasons – both ethical and business-wise – for not jumping onto such requests. The obvious one being limited time and treating all clients equal, but the best one in my point of view being the value of true expertise: Based on years of experience you might only need five minutes to solve a problem that requires somebody else doing days of research. That’s exactly why those first minutes might be the most valuable.

I am speaking from experience although such things fortunately did happen to me rarely. But when they did, it was freaking me out. I once got a call from an unknown lawyer who was in the middle of installing his very own Public Key Infrastructure; he started asking technical questions before introducing himself. I tried to explain that I was actually charging people for such services, and that I assumed he did not do legal counselling for free either. His response was that he was maintaining all his IT stuff by himself – just this topic was too complicated for him so he needed advice. So services should be free if a professional solves a particularly tricky problem. This defies common sense.

I also thought I had a killer argument, non-refutable. I am actually providing technical information on ‘the internet’ – the same sort of answers or materials I would charge clients for. The difference is that I am not obligated to do this, so I pick this case by case. I believe in open-source-style sharing in a community of like-minded members. I am a believer in demonstrating skills in real time instead of showing off certificates – it goes without saying this might include giving away some valuable advice for demo purposes at the start of a business relationship.

Unfortunately, this demo-for-business argument that is used too often by people who want to milk your know-how forever – just testing how far they can go – without ever really considering a ‘business relationship’. As soon as you tell them the answer to the next question will not be free of charge anymore, they suddenly stop asking.

Fortunately, I get enough feedback by providing so much detailed information for free!!. A few people who don’t get it would not shatter my confidence. Interestingly, people who still challenge me (But then you don’t have time for me??) are those whom I would not consider part of any ‘sharing’ communities or get their spirit in the slightest. I think all those issues belong in the category: Either you get it immediately and communication is based on tacit understanding what is normal and appropriate – or all explanations are in vain.

Many years ago I had been asked literally if I would like to work for free. Corporations send out request for proposals and ask for lots of free concepts and presentations – until they have gathered enough know-how from all the potential vendors invited so that finally they have learned enough from the ‘pitches’ and can do the whole project on their own. Finally I had my antennas finely tuned to all your typical manipulations methods (I have already told X you will do [unpaid honorable engagement] Y – if you don’t, this will get me into serious troubles!). Many people are driven by short-term impulses, not by malice (I have to solve this problem or my boss will kill me!) and they respond to logical arguments: What would you say if you were a paying client and find out that I do free consulting for other people at random? Some manipulators are hopeless cases though, especially if they think they provide something in return that is actually less than useless to you.

Horowitz’ war stories resonated with me more than I expected. He emphasizes dealing with organizationally or psychologically difficult issues head-on. I read his advice as: Better act sooner than later, better state the ugly truth upfront. Better take some decision at all, even if it is just 55% versus 45%. Communicate clearly, don’t use fluffy phrases. Sometimes people explicitly appreciated my way of saying No immediately and unambiguously, instead of endless dithering and not trying to hurt anybody which seems to have become fashionable in times of Networking and You Will Always Meet Two Times.

wine-clarity

Searching my own images for own that would represent both mental clarity as well as difficult decisions – I zoomed in this one immediately. (Vineyards close to my home village, evening at the beginning of May.)

Although this is tagged with ‘rant’ it should not be interpreted as what I actually consider pointless and energy-draining – endless rants about common practices in your industry sector that you cannot change but have to live with. I am in the Love It, Change It, Or Leave It camp. I have also been writing about the past, and often a single annoying event of that sort had made me shift gears.

I believe the best – and most productive – way to cope with weird requests is to either: Respond clearly and immediately using a standardized I-don’t-do reply, then ignore them as an accidental, misguided question that just happened to end up in your inbox; or: to analyze if an aspect of your previous communication might have invited such inquiries, and improve your future communications. And don’t aim at being liked by anybody, anytime.

When I Did Social Engineering without Recognizing It

I planned to read something about history this summer.

Then I picked the history of hacking. My favorite was Kevin Mitnick’s autobiography – the very definition of a page-turner.

The book is free of hardcore technical jargon and written for geeks and lay audience alike. Readers are introduced to the spirit of a hacker in the older sense of the word: Mitnick’s hacks were motivated by the thrill of exploring systems but he never gained financially.

Kevin Mitnick successfully obtained the latest source code of cell phones,

reports on security vulnerabilities in operating systems, and legitimately looking birth certificates of deceased children to setup new identity – due to his combination of technical skills and mastery of social engineering. He got people to reveal corporate information they should not. Pieces of information are seemingly innocuous in their own rights – a name of server, a corporate directory of employees – but it helps the social engineer to learn the lingo and pose as a trusted insider.

Computer-police

I adhere to the conventions re hackneyed images (Wikimedia).

I often had been called way too honest – and thus not getting anywhere in life, professionally. So I was asking myself:

Could I con people into breaking rules? The intuitive answer was of course No.

But then the following anecdote emerged from a dark corner of my mind.

A long time ago I had worked as an IT Infrastructure Manager – responsible for quite a colorful IT environment run partly by subversive non-official admins. I actually transitioned into that role from supporting some of the latter. One of the less delightful duties was to keep those subversive elements from building rogue websites and circumvent the bureaucratic corporate content management system – by purchasing internet domains like super-fancy-product-name.com and hosting these services where they figured I would not find it.

I also had to clean up legacy mess.

One time we had to migrate an internet domain hosted on behalf of an Another Very Important Organization to one of their servers. Routine stuff, had the domain been under our control. But it was tied to a subversive website a department had once set up, working with an external marketing consultancy. The consulting company was – as per the whois records – the official owner of the domain.

Actually the owner listed was not even that company was a person employed by that company but not working for them anymore. I consulted with the corporate lawyers in it would have been a legal knot hard to disentangle.

However, I had to transfer the stuff right now. Internet domains have a legal owner and an administrative and a technical contact. The person able to do the transfer is the latter but he or she must not do it unless instructed to do so.

I tracked down and the technical contact and called him up. The tech-c’s phone number is public information, very easy to find back then – nowadays you might need a tiny bit of social engineering to obtain it.

I explained the whole case to him – the whole truth in all details. He was a helpful network administrator working for a small internet provider. Having to deal with a typical network admin’s predicament immediately built a kind of bond. This is one of the things that makes working in IT infrastructure management enjoyable – in a job you are only noticed if something goes wrong. (The rest of the time you are scolded for needing too much money and employing too much personnel).

The result was that the domain was technically transferred to the intended target organization’s server immediately. But: If somebody asks you how this has been done – it wasn’t me!

This is the same concluding remark uttered by an admin in another telco later – whom I had convinced to provide me some password of a company. Also that inquiry of mine and reasons given were true and legitimate as I was doing it on behalf of a client – the password owner.

In both cases there was a third party, a client or colleague or employer, who was quite happy with the results.

But there weren’t any formal checks involved – people did not ask me for a verifiable phone number to call me back or wanted to talk to my boss or to the client. If I just had fabricated the stories I would have managed to get a domain transferred and obtain a hosting customer’s password.

Rusty and Crusty PadlockThe psychologically interesting part of my job was that I didn’t have real power to tell departments what they must or must not do. I could just persuade them.

I think this is an aspect very common to many corporate jobs today – jobs with with grand titles but just a bunch of feeble dotted lines to the rest of the corporate universe and its peripheral contractors’ satellites – some of which you never meet face-to-face.

Combine that with an intricate tangle of corporate guidelines and rules – many of them set up to enforce security and compliance. In some environments people hardly get their jobs done without breaking or bending a subset of those rules.

Social engineering in some sense is probably what makes companies still being able to function at all.

Career Advice – Borrowing Wise Words from a Sailing Hacker

On researching SSL-related hacks, I have stumbled upon the website of notable security researcher Moxie Marlinspike.

Marlinspike is also a sailor and working on diverse projects, such as Audio Anarchy – a project for transcribing anarchist books into audio format. On his About page he says:

I like computer security and software development, particularly in the areas of secure protocols, cryptography, privacy, and anonymity. But I also secretly hate technology, am partially horrified with the direction “geek” culture has gone.

and

In general, I hope to contribute to a world where we value skills and relationships over careers and money, where we know better than to trust cops or politicians, and where we’re passionate about building and creating things in a self-motivated and self-directed way.

I call myself Subversive El(k)ement, Security Consultant, Search Term Poet, and Luddite in Disguise … how could I not relate

So it was not a surprise that I found myself in total agreement with his career advice.

Moxie’s post starts with

What I want to say, more often than not, is something along the lines of don’t do it;

This is reminiscent of Via Negativa I learned about from Nassim Taleb’s writings. I have also  found it more helpful to state what I don’t like instead of phrasing so-called SMART goals. When planning positively you try to target a small point in the vast space of options – likely to be missed – in contrast to the negative approach of avoiding a subset of options and keeping a considerable part of them in reach.

From the famous Stanford Prison experiment Moxie draws a simpler lesson as an individual – and it seems more palpable to me than that grand discussions about morals and free will:

 … just be careful what job you take, because your job will change you.

You should look at the people working in a certain environment or industry sector and think twice if you want to become like them. This is not self-evident: At times I was dead set to break into a world whose representatives were anti-role-models – but of course I wanted to revolutionize the whole sector. Finally I have found out that it is more rewarding to go where the people are to whom you can relate with.

Moxie talks about choices we all make, and how the first of those, early in our careers, are defined by supporting structures like family, school, or university:

When we arrive at the ends of these funnels, it’s possible that the direction we’re facing is more a reflection of those structures than it is a reflection of ourselves. Self-determination in a moment like that can’t simply be about making a choice, it has to start with transforming the conditions that constitute our choices. It requires challenging the “self” in “self-determination” by stepping as far outside of those supporting structures as possible, for as long as possible.

It is silly to attempt at rushing through our lives, taking conscious decisions as early as possible and trying to cast your perfect CV in stone, as

There’s no rush to get started early on a never-ending task.

Moxie concludes that in relation to the inquiries about career advice, he is:

… likely to respond with something like “if I were you, I’d hitchhike to Alaska this summer instead.”

He advocates

… doing the absolute minimum amount of work necessary to prevent starvation, and then doing something that’s not about money, completely outside of supporting structures, and not simply a matter of “consuming experience”

I can anticipate objections, and you can also find them in the comments on his Moxie’s post. How to pay the bills? How to feed the kids?

Actually I have re-written this post several times because of this – but, alas, I will not be able to avoid all ambiguity. All I want to say is that Moxie’s post struck a chord with me. Though targeted to students it is this classical advice to the younger self that exactly that self might not like. It took me ~20 years to come to that conclusion and act accordingly.

I think the primary target group of articles like this are people who arguably have choices but don’t use them – people who err on the side of caution. I don’t want to downplay the predicament of the single mum working two jobs but rather speak to the unhappy Head Chief Architect Officer of Something Sounding Really Impressive But Actually Doing Unnerving Grunt Work That Just Happens To Be Extremely Well Paid.

I am also not at all trying to evangelize among those who wholeheartedly enjoy their stressful jobs. There is this subtle dance of intriguing yet stressful work and inspiration that makes it enjoyable nonetheless. The big caveat here is that you need to find out on your own what exactly stresses you out in a fatal way – and this is not necessarily straight-forward. It is to be experienced, not to be determined by theorizing.

Based on my experience, anecdotal as it is, I dare hypothesize that there is an impressive percentage of respected middle-class corporate employees who do ponder about an alternative life as that iconic free sailor. My job role had been that of a technical consultant ever since but I had become more of a project psychologist at times. I was to hear surprising confessions – after we had left the formalities of the professional negotiations behind and people started philosophizing over coffee.

Generally speaking, I believe that most of us living in stable democracies are freer than we think. I am saying this as the inhabitant of a country whose primary mentality is not exactly shaped by entrepreneurial spirit and daring. I know how the collective submission to alleged obligations work.

As for using kids as a main counter-argument to a ‘free’ life-style, I was reminded of that most recent controversy about adventurous parents living and rising their kids on boats. – an impossible life for most people. Considering their life-styles too risky gives proof of how warped our sense of risks and probabilities is, and how over-valued spectacular risks of The Uncommon are in comparison to the dull, but near certain health risks of the accepted, sedentary living in a modern civilization.

We do make choices all the way, and be it just choosing the life expected from us by those supporting structures. When we are grown up we don’t have much excuses for not taking accountability – and this does not at all mean a perfectly streamlined career plan.

Quoting Moxie again:

Be careful not to discover a career before you’ve discovered yourself.

The best advice is not to follow any advice (incl. this one), question everything, and decide for yourself.

Still from Kon-Tiki movie

From a documentary about Kon-Tiki (Wikimedia) – not sure if it is the new movie.

This post will be filed under Life – a collection that recently struck me as much too serious and solemn.

In any case – if that happened again, I would just like everybody to know that I have never been happier; and I am weighing my words carefully.

Diffusion of iTechnology in Corporations (or: Certificates for iPhones)

[Jump to technical stuff]

Some clichés are true. One I found confirmed often is about how technologies are adopted within organizations: One manager meets another manager at a conference / business meeting / CIO event. Manager X show off the latest gadget and/or brags about presents a case-study of successful implementation of Y.

Another manager becomes jealous inspired, and after returning home he immediately calls upon his poor subordinates and have them implement Y – absolutely, positively, ASAP.

I suspect that this is the preferred diffusion mechanism for implementing SAP at any kind of organization or for the outsourcing hype (probably also the insourcing-again movement that followed it).

And I definitely know this works that way for iSomething such as iPhones and iPads. Even if iSomething might be not the officially supported standard. But no matter how standardized IT and processes are – there is always something like VIP support. I do remember vividly how I was one told that we (the IT guys) should not be so overly obliging when helping users –  unless I (the top manager) needs something.

So trying to help those managers is the root cause for having to solve a nice puzzle: iThings need to have access to the network and thus often need digital certificates. Don’t tell me that certificates might not be the perfect solution – I know that. But working in some sort of corporate setting you are often not in the position to bring up these deep philosophical questions again and again, so let’s focus on solving the puzzle:

[Technical stuff – I am trying a new format to serve different audiences here]

Certificates for Apple iPhone 802.1x / EAP-TLS WLAN Logon

The following is an environment you would encounter rather frequently: Computer and user accounts are managed in Microsoft Active Directory – providing both Kerberos authentication infrastructure and LDAP directory. Access to Wireless LAN is handled by RADIUS authentication using Windows Network Protection Server, and client certificates are mandatory as per RADIUS policies.

You could require 802.1x to be done by either user accounts and/or machine accounts (though it is a common misunderstanding that in this way you can enforce a logon by 1) the computer account and then 2) the user account at the same machine.) I am now assuming that computers (only) are authenticated. This the iDevice needs to present itself as a computer to the logon servers.

Certificates contain lots of fields and standards either don’t enforce clearly what should go into those fields and/or applications interpret standards in weird ways. Thus the pragmatic approach is to tinker and test.

This is the certificate design that works for iPhones according to my experience:

  • We need a ‘shadow account’ in Active Directory whose properties will match fields in the certificates. Two LDAP attributes needto be set
    1. dnsHostName: machine.domain.com
      This is going to be mapped onto the DNS name in the Subject Alternative Name of the certificate.
    2. servicePrincipalNames: HOST/machine.domain.com
      This makes the shadow account a happy member of the Kerberos realm.

    According to my tests, the creation of an additional name mapping – as recommended here – is not required. We are using Active Directory default mapping here – DNS machine names work just as user’s UPNs (User Principal Name – the logon name in user@dmain syntax. See e.g. Figure 21 – Certificate Processing Logic – in this white paper for details.)

  • Extensions and fields in the certificate
    1. Subject Alternative Name: machine.domain.com (mapped to the DNS name dnsHostName in AD)
    2. Subject CN: host/machine.domain.com. This is different from Windows computers – as far as I understood what’s going on from RADIUS logging the Apple 802.1x client sends the string just as it appears in the CN. Windows clients would add the prefix host/ automatically.
    3. If this is a Windows Enterprise PKI: Copy the default template Workstation Authentication, and configure the Subject Name as to be submitted with the Request. The CA needs to accept custom SANs via enabling the  EDITF_ATTRIBUTESUBJECTALTNAME2 flag. Keys need to be configured as exportable to carry them over to the iDevice.
  • Create the key, request and certificate on a dedicated enrollment machine. Note that this should be done in the context of the user rather than the local machine. Certificates/key could be transported to another machines as PKCS#12 (PFX files).
  • Import the key and certificate to the iPhone using the iPhone Configuration Manager – this tools allows for exporting directly from the current user’s store. So if the user does not enroll for those certificates himself (which makes sense as the enrollment procedure is somewhat special, given the custom names), the PFX files would be first imported to the user’s store and then exported from there to the iPhone.

The point I like to stress in relation to certificates is that logon against AD is based on matching strings – containing the DNS names – not on a binary comparison of a file presented by the client versus a certificate file in the directory.

I have encountered that misconception often as there is an attribute in AD – userCertificate – that is actually designed for holding users’ (or machines’) certificates. But this is more of a Alice-tries-to-get-Bob’s-public-key-phonebook-style attribute, and it is not intended to be used for authentication but rather for encryption – Outlook is searching for S/MIME e-mail recipients’ public keys there. Disclaimer: I cannot vouch for any custom application that may exist.

Authentication is secure nonetheless as the issuing CA’s certificate needs to be present in a special LDAP object, the so-called NTAuth object in Active Directory’s Configuration Container, and per default it can only be edited by Enterprise Admins – the ‘root admins’ of AD. In addition you have to configure the CA for accepting arbitrary SANs in requests.

IPhone Fashion Valley

Happy iPhone users with their iPhones, when the product was released in 2007. I have never owned any iThing so I need to borrow an image from Wikimedia (user 1DmkIIN).

What Entrepreneurs Need to Have

Chances are that many readers had to do one of those things as corporate employees or as members of any large organization that asks management consultants for help: brainstorm on a vision, formulate a mission statement, create a business plan. As an aspiring start-up business owner  you cannot escape trainers who tell you need a have a logo designed by professionals, hire MBAs as CFOs, hire more professionals to dream up a great marketing strategy, and execute That Great Plan based on Your Sincere Belief in That Great Singular Idea.

This does not resonate with my experiences as an entrepreneur though. You might expect correctly that I would rather go for antifragile ‘dilettante’ tinkering – and all those buzz words make me remember that eerie documentary of brave new corporate world.

It is refreshing to find confirmation by a very successful founder of start-ups. I have linked Frank Levinson’s Top 10 Things You Must Have to Start a Business so often – it deserves a dedicated post. As usual I cannot resist pointing out some resemblance with Nassim Taleb‘s ideas.

Note to readers who might miss the physics in this post: Frank Levinson is a physics PhD and self-educated programmer. He has given an extensive interview about his career to the Center for History of Physics of the American Institute of Physics – the transcript can be found here. I was most impressed by his ability to deal with failure – he founded his successful venture Finisar after he had been fired as a CEO of a company he had founded himself. Levinson called it Finisar as he hadn’t finished anything before.

You Need Comfortable, Cheap Furniture – It doesn’t matter how you look but what you do.

This is in contrast to all that advice about branding and (online) reputation. Customers should not be jealous of your Porsche company car or suspect that those high rates they are charged for go into hiring designers that tweak your corporate identity every month.

Remember the coconuts!

The German title of Monty Python and the Holy Grail is: Knights of the Coconut. Horses were replaced by coconuts for budget reasons and this joke has gone viral. Monthy Python were creative and innovative because of constraints and necessities.

Levinson believes that therefore entrepreneurs need not enough money. In addition, the best money you can use is customer’s money – found the company on an existing revenue stream – or literally use your own money.

After all, it is about what Nassim Taleb would call Skin in the Game.

Pride of a Fat Baby and 1000 Ideas

Which pride does a fat baby have? Exactly: None.  In contrast to Focus on Your Core Business and Go for that Great Idea (probably accompanied by Follow Your Passion) Levinson advocates accepting project requests appearing as tangential to your aspired core business. His company did contract engineering for some years, then delivered bad products we considered good ones and finally manufactured really good products.

This is Taleb’s Optionality. Those seemingly odd projects allow for interaction with real customers, collection of feedback from the real world. Levinson also advises to love your tough customers – those who complain about the product – because they are really interested.

Non-core-business projects might give you new ideas and turn change your so-called business plan based. Actually, you should be generous with ideas and give away 1000s of ideas (for money), e.g. in contract engineering, rather than believing you have stumbled upon that singular idea – knowing exactly what the world really needs, based on your impeccable market studies.

“Common Sense”: You Need Customers

Sounds trivial, but isn’t. Frank Levinson’s key message is that customers are people who place an order and pay for services or product received. Customers are not: People who like your idea, would love to get free samples, and do co-development.

It is so simply but yet it cannot be overstated when you read it ten times a day in articles tweeted how important it is to grow your network, exchange ideas, find partners.

It resonates with my experience: The most enjoyable business relationships start with a client really in need what I offer – I do it – the client is happy and pays in due time. Actually it always was those business relationship that naturally morph into friendships. But the alleged friendships with people who want to discuss market potential over a coffee hardly ever turn into business.

Sure, customers need to know you exist. But as Levinson I feel that advice for start-ups over-emphasizes the importance of marketing to the point of replacing the requirement of having a very product with sophisticated marketing! Professional marketing, business plans, Vice Presidents (suits) should materialize very late in the company’s growth process – before an IPO, thus probably never if you decide to remain a small privately owned business.

Social media can help to connect with potential clients – your mileage may vary depending on the very nature of your business. Yet I believe Levinson is still right in being wary about the significance of a website as engineers are shy and hope to replace face-to-face customer contact by virtual online communications.

But watch the video yourself – 19 minutes well spent: